Serena Movie Trailer

I loved Ron Rash's novel Serena, so I'm both excited and a little wary of the upcoming film adaption. I think Jennifer Lawrence was a good choice for the titular character and the new official trailer indicates the movie will stay true to the book's gritty, rustic Depressiom-era setting...

Rainbow Rowell: Landline

Rainbow Rowell has quickly become one of my favorite authors. I enjoyed Rowell's first two novels so much that, upon finishing Fangirl, I immediately dove headfirst into her spectacular third book, Landline. Star-crossed lovers, love triangles, long distance phone calls, quirky time travel, marital problems, crazy relatives, happy endings, second chances and a plethora of... Continue Reading →

Rainbow Rowell: Fangirl

I just finished reading Rainbow Rowell's Fangirl and it's been a long time since I've enjoyed a work of contemporary fiction so much. Much like Rowell's widely beloved previous novel, Eleanor & Park, Fangirl is an easy but well written and extraordinarily empathetic YA book. Fangirl tells a lighter story than the emotionally wrought Eleanor... Continue Reading →

Ted Galdi: Elixir

Ted Galdi's debut novel, Elixir, is a fast-paced cyber thriller with echoes of Michael Crichton and Outbreak. The protagonist is a mathematical whiz kid who gets caught up in a bizarre tale of international intrigue, cyber terrorism and Ebola. Plagued by his past as a child genius on Jeopardy, Sean Malone struggles to fit in... Continue Reading →

Current Read: The Poet of Tolstoy Park

Currently reading The Poet of Tolstoy Park by Sonny Brewer, a so far beautifully written, literary novel based on the true story of an elderly man in 1925 who spontaneously decides to move from Idaho to Alabama to ruminate on life, poetry and Tolstoy after he is diagnosed with a terminal illness.

Current Read: The Piano Tuner

Currently reading The Piano Tuner by Daniel Mason, a novel about a shy piano tuner commissioned to repair a rare piano for an eccentric army doctor who uses music and poetry to broker peace between warring tribes in 19th century Burma.

S. by J.J. Abrams & Doug Dorst

Remember how unique, intelligent and exciting Lost seemed to be the first few seasons? How we kept plodding through the weaker storylines, annoying characters and complicated plot twists, because the little cryptic details so strongly hinted at a greater mystery that we felt certain would ultimately lead to a mindblowing epiphany when the series finally... Continue Reading →

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑